Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why is it so hard to not move when taking picture ?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Why is it so hard to not move when taking picture ?

    Hello

    i use my panono without hdr and in daytime when i use it with a stick, it is very very hard to get a picture on which the camera has not motion blur.

    Why is it so hard to get a clear picture ?

    I absolutly don't have this problem with my samsung gear 360 when i use the same stick !!!!

    Also, is it planned to add a timer on the android app so after pushing the button, we have time to hide the phone !!!

    ‚ÄčThank you
    Last edited by parisien; 03-01-17, 19:51.

  • #2
    Just double checking - when you say blur, do you mean double images, like this?
    https://www.panono.com/p/ZCzIAPbi5840

    If so, it appears you have HDR enabled. This causes three photos to be taken in quick succession at various brightness levels - they are then merged together to avoid overly dark or overly bright areas.

    If you download the UPF you should get a file that is around 100Mb. When unpacked, this contains 108 images - three from each of the 36 lenses. You should be able to select the 36 "middle brightness" images and manually merge them, resulting in a blur-free image but with not as good tolerance for dark/bright patches.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by chuq View Post
      Just double checking - when you say blur, do you mean double images, like this?
      https://www.panono.com/p/ZCzIAPbi5840

      If so, it appears you have HDR enabled. This causes three photos to be taken in quick succession at various brightness levels - they are then merged together to avoid overly dark or overly bright areas.

      If you download the UPF you should get a file that is around 100Mb. When unpacked, this contains 108 images - three from each of the 36 lenses. You should be able to select the 36 "middle brightness" images and manually merge them, resulting in a blur-free image but with not as good tolerance for dark/bright patches.
      thank you for your answer.

      But as i said in my post HDR is not activated.

      It is more like this :https://www.panono.com/p/dJXaYsmfIAQG

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by parisien View Post
        thank you for your answer.

        But as i said in my post HDR is not activated.

        It is more like this :https://www.panono.com/p/dJXaYsmfIAQG
        Sorry parisien! I must have skimmed through your post and not noticed that bit :-/

        Most blurry photos I have taken are due to HDR (going by the double shots) or by low light (like this one - https://www.panono.com/p/SjxX1dZ2s1eC ). Your picture looks very bright so I doubt it would be that.

        The other thing is that when using the stick, often the picture will not be taken until a second or two after pressing the button. Sometimes I've pre-emptively moved the stick before the photos were taken.



        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by chuq View Post

          Sorry parisien! I must have skimmed through your post and not noticed that bit :-/

          Most blurry photos I have taken are due to HDR (going by the double shots) or by low light (like this one - https://www.panono.com/p/SjxX1dZ2s1eC ). Your picture looks very bright so I doubt it would be that.

          The other thing is that when using the stick, often the picture will not be taken until a second or two after pressing the button. Sometimes I've pre-emptively moved the stick before the photos were taken.


          I think more that it is because the panono need a more much exposure time than other products even in daytime.

          Is that normal ?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by parisien View Post
            I think more that it is because the panono need a more much exposure time than other products even in daytime.

            Is that normal ?

            You can change that through the option

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by EluardMatthieu View Post


              You can change that through the option
              I know that.

              But with all the other camera i tested, it calculated a correct exposure time in daytime si there is no blur.
              You mean that the panono don't calculate this exposure time correctly and i have to correct it myself with the settings ?

              Thank you

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by parisien View Post
                I know that.

                But with all the other camera i tested, it calculated a correct exposure time in daytime si there is no blur.
                You mean that the panono don't calculate this exposure time correctly and i have to correct it myself with the settings ?

                Thank you


                no, i just mean that if you want specific option, you can have them.

                its blurry because you move, nothing more.

                with the stick, when i hit the button its sometimes blurry because of the movement of my finger.


                You can hold the stick, but take a pano with the app via your other hand


                you can do it with your bare hand like here (stick not allowed):

                https://www.panono.com/p/Kd5w6P7a7mnX

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by parisien View Post
                  I think more that it is because the panono need a more much exposure time than other products even in daytime.

                  Is that normal ?
                  I wouldn't have thought in daytime it would be an issue (any time where a normal camera wouldn't need a flash), but in the evening it would be blurry (since of course the Panono has no flash).

                  I haven't played about with the exposure time or ISO settings manually (or even looked at what they are adjusted to when set manually).

                  I know that EXIF data of photos from digital cameras usually has this data, but of course technically the 360 degree image may not have this data since it doesn't technically have an exposure, shutter or ISO setting - the individual lenses do.

                  I just looked at the individual files (from the UPF file) and they don't include the EXIF data either, so I don't think there is anyway to know unless I check the setting immediately before taking a photo.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm also struggling with motion blur, tried with and without HDR. I always use a monopod so it's not the camera moving.
                    I think it would be good to be able to see the settings that auto choses so that we can make manual improvements.
                    I'd also like an indicator in the 'more' section of each photo to show if HDR was enabled or not, once the photos are edited you don't know if HDR was on.
                    Will watch this post with interest

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jonas
                      parisien When you say "I absolutly don't have this problem with my samsung gear 360 when i use the same stick !!!!" What stick are you using exactly for both setups?

                      Which areas of the example https://www.panono.com/p/dJXaYsmfIAQG do you find too blurry? The moving people or the background?

                      Kind regards,
                      Jonas
                      Hello

                      I use the same stick for my gear 360 and the panono it is a hard stick like this http://amzn.to/1Jh0OcH with your adaptator for the panono.

                      I am talking about the background. When you zoom you see that everything is blurry.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by parisien View Post

                        When you zoom you see that everything is blurry.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          From a Nikon D5100 user:

                          Originally posted by stackexchange.com
                          Without seeing an example image, it's hard to tell which of the following is the problem.
                          • Your lens is on manual focus.
                            Note that having the camera's exposure dial on the green "Auto" is not the same thing as auto-focus. Auto-focus is usually controlled on the side of the lens itself with an "A/M" switch.
                          • The subject is moving too fast for your shutter speed.
                            If you are photographing a person, use a shutter speed of 1/250s or faster. If you are photographing a fast-moving person such as a kid, animal or sports, use 1/500s or faster - that is, if you want to eliminate motion blur.
                            If you cannot get to this shutter speed, you probably need more light or a lens that can open to a wider aperture.
                          • The camera is shaking.
                            If your shutter speed is too slow, even the small movement of your hands on the camera can cause blur due to camera shake. As a general rule, avoid using a shutter speed slower than 1/50s, or if you are zoomed in (telephoto), avoid using a shutter speed slower than 1/(focal length), ie 1/135s if you are zoomed in to 135mm.
                            If you cannot get to this shutter speed, you probably need more light or a lens that can open to a wider aperture.
                          • Subject is moving out of focus.
                            If the subject is moving, then they may have moved out of focus in between the time the autofocus mechanism focused, and the camera took the photo. This is particularly true if you are very close to the subject and they are moving fairly fast toward or away from you.
                            Try to get your subject still, or use a wider shot. Some cameras are faster at focusing and exposing than others.
                          • You haven't focused on the subject.
                            Cameras will only focus on a certain part of the image at once. In full auto mode, it usually picks an area to focus intelligently, which works most of the time but sometimes picks the wrong part of the image to focus on.
                            The quickest fix to this is to half-press the shutter to focus while directly pointing at the subject you most want to focus on (most cameras give emphasis to what's in the middle of the frame), keep it half-pressed, and then move the camera to take the picture you originally wanted, then fully-press the shutter. You can also set the camera to choose a specific focus area instead of choosing one automatically, which will make this technique even more effective (and necessary).
                          • The subject is too close.
                            The lens has a limit to how close you can take photos. This is probably only going to be the case if you are extremely close, say less than 12 inches from the subject on a typical lens. Some lenses can focus very close, say 4cm (2 inches). Others designed for viewing distant objects may have trouble below 2 feet.
                            Normally if this is the case, there will be a light or beeping noise (or different/lack of beeping noise) to indicate the autofocus failed.
                          • There is not enough light for the autofocus to work well.
                            In dark environments such as a dimly lit room, the autofocus sensors in a DSLR may not work as well, may work more slowly, or may not work at all. Even in situations where there is enough light to take a photo (say, using a high ISO or using a flash) there still may not be enough light for the autofocus sensors to work well.
                            Many cameras have an autofocus-assist light (orange or red light coming on during autofocus) which you can enable to help with this in some situations. Again, the camera should show a light, or beep (or not beep/beep differently) to indicate that the autofocus is having problems.
                            Bonus hint: some cameras have an autofocus sensor in the centre of the frame that is better able to cope with low light than the surrounding autofocus sensors. Try lining up your subject in the centre of the frame on half-press, if you're in a dark environment.
                          • The autofocus mechanism in the lens is faulty.
                            It's unlikely, but it's possible that the lens focusing mechanism has dirt in it or is jammed. Switch the lens to manual and see if it turns smoothly and freely. If not, it's one sign that there could be something wrong with the lens that would require taking it back to a camera shop.
                          url: http://photo.stackexchange.com/quest...hen-zooming-in

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X